Justifying Game of Throne’s Lackluster “Purple Wedding”

Game of Thrones

I think it goes without saying that anytime Game of Thrones and a wedding are mentioned in the same sentence, it’s best to ignore what’s beyond the wall like the plague if you don’t want major plot points spoiled. If you’ve read the books, you know what’s being spoiled, so you don’t have a reason to complain. But with Game of Throne’s universally acclaimed success on TV, the majority of fans will be getting their fill from the show, instead of the books. Admittedly, I haven’t read the books up to the point of the show, but from what I’ve gathered from my book worm friends, it was pretty damn faithful. With that said, you’ve been warned of the spoilers.

No, seriously. The hand holding stops here.

Game of Thrones

During the fan-dubbed “Purple Wedding,” King Joffrey Baratheon and Margery Tyrll tie the knot, and in true Game of Thrones fashion, an important character dies. This time, deservingly, it’s Joffrey.

After years of waiting for the bastard king to get what he deserves, we finally get to see it play out on the small screen. Of course, what’s depicted in a book doesn’t always translate well to TV.

The tired trope of poisoning a king with a glass of wine failed to impress its fair share of fans, myself included. The entire lead up to the dire moment hinted at the poisoning so strongly, I felt as if it was meant to throw us off the scent of the remarkable death that was about to occur. Maybe instead of poisoning him, Tyrion’s whorerr… love of his life, Shae, will get beheaded, driving Tyrion to finally snap! Imps gone wild! Nope. Sip of wine, followed by bedtime.

Game of Thrones

Despite the initial disappointment, I couldn’t stay mad at them for going this route. The events have to follow the source material to an extent, otherwise we’d have a completely different house of fans calling for someone’s head. According to some of my book-reading friends and coworkers, as well as my brief glimpse at a wiki, it would appear that Joffrey’s death was splendidly portrayed in comparison to the events in A Song of Ice and Fire. Only minor details were left out or changed, such as the location and Joffrey clawing his throat for air.

Most importantly, Joffrey’s death drives the point home that the fans aren’t in control of what happens in the world of Game of Thrones. There’s a history of writers and producers wanting to please their fans. If the fans had it their way, Joffery would have been slowly beheaded by a dull blade in the hands of Robb Stark, but we all know why that won’t happen. The Seven Kingdoms are home to the most realistic (yet strangely magical) we can find ourselves immersed in. Supporting characters die left and right. Main characters are living on borrowed time. Kings go out with a whimper.

Game of Thrones

And I wouldn’t have it any other way.

For each disappointing moment I’ve encountered, I’ve been able to sit back and reflect on why they weren’t really all that disappointing; instead, they were uplifting. They are different than what the medium had instilled in my mind as expected outcomes of events. And that’s what Game of Thrones does best, it reinvents classic tropes and constantly keeps us on our toes. With every death, a seed of infinite possibilities is planted in our minds in memory of the fallen. That’s a lot of fucking trees.

And with that said…

Game of Thrones