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Noragami Episode 8-12 Review

Noragami

Bones’ adaptation of Adachitoka’s Noragami reaches its climax, but not before focusing on Yukine a bit more than I would have liked. Then again, it was poignant to the plot, and necessary for a lot of reasons, but as a result, the ending to the series felt rushed and was practically reduced to two episodes. They were two pretty great episodes but, two rushed episode nonetheless. But, all of that aside, Noragami was still a solid series throughout its 12 episode arc, and there’s always the manga series to look out for if you’d like more Yato nonsense. The world has long been since established, so let’s take a look at the middle-to-end of Noragami.

Yukine’s still a little brat, but he’s hurting Yato. Not just emotionally, but physically. Every time a god’s shinki (divine weapon) acts poorly, it affects the owner; so each time Yukine steals something, breaks something, or is utterly a bad being, Yato feels the effects, so much that is causes him blight. When a god has suffered too much blight, an ablution must transpire and the shinki is either cured or banished. Unfortunately, a bulk of this cours episode center around Yukine and Yatos’ struggles with this issue, and for me, if focused too long on this side-plot. Luckily, once this labored idea is over, the series heads towards its finale and wraps a nice little bow on it all.

Anime, Bones, Funimation, Manga, Noragami, studio bones,

A new enemy, Rabō appears on the scene from Yato’s past, and he and the newly reformed Yukine must combat his masterful strength. Hiyori gets a bit more light in the picture too, and the trio work together to overcome this other God of Calamity. In some beautiful fight scenes, the two test their mettle in a rather underwhelming battle. Rabō essentially wants Yato to atone and a rematch, and really does nothing more than hinder them with minor obstacles and over-talking. A majority of the final battle is just him stating over and over to ‘fight me.’ It all just felt rushed and underwhelming, and Rabō could have been a truly memorable, strong villain, were there more time devoted to him and his past with Yato. It was a real missed opportunity to introduce him so late to the series, and the climax suffered as a result.

Sadly, the music still never resonated with me throughout the series’ run, so that’s a bummer, but the animation and direction on most of the scenes were some top-notch Bones animation. With their next big projects ready to start very soon, they have yet to disappoint me in the animation department, and I can’t wait to see what their future holds. Noragami isn’t a weak series, and I’ve enjoyed my time with it, but it’s unlikely I’ll ever return to it. It’s a brisk 12 episodes, so you can breeze through it in a weekend, but there’s little there to bring you back afterwards. Interesting ideas and a world mired by one plodding pace and one rushed ending. Perhaps fans of the series will cherish it more, and we’ll see a second season down the line, but one season was more than enough for me with Noragami. I liked what you had, but I won’t be praying to see more from this God of Calamity any time soon.

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Curtis Stone

Curtis Stone

Anime Guru
Like most people here, I've been watching anime for many, many year, and I owe blocks like Toonami for getting me into the medium. Shows like Dragonball Z and Ronin Warriors shaped my beginning years, while shows like Neon Genesis Evangleion and Cowboy Bebop showed me that there's some true artistic ability and expression found within anime (moreso than big burly dudes punching and screaming for hours on end). I try to watch all kinds of anime, but I stick closely to action and shonen, but I'm gravitating towards more slice-of-life series and films thanks to directors like Makoto Shinkai and Hayao Miyazaki. Anime is just another great, creative medium for telling stories, and I'm happy to share my thoughts on the series I enjoy with you!
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